Stew Meat Recipes

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Beef Stew Appetizers Recipe

Beef Stew Appetizers

02.06.14 by Jackie

Baby Aria is a toddler now and even though I tend to feed her soft food, I still want her to experience the different textures and flavors each meal can bring. I prepared a beef stew, which she adored, but I still had a little meat left. So I shredded it with a fork, formed little mounds and used them for appetizers.

I always have extra dough stored in my freezer (I used the same dough for my roasted butternut squash galette earlier this week). I formed little pockets by cutting rectangles of dough and pinching the edges with the back of fork. These little appetizers were so addictive that they were all gone in a jiffy.


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Pot Au Feu Recipe (French Beef Stew) Recipe

I don't make pot-au-feu very often but I felt like giving myself a treat today. I made the French-style beef stew using oxtail bones. The dish looks very rustic and doesn't require exquisite cuts of meat. The oxtail pieces provide a nice texture thanks to their gelatin content. The gravy consists of turnip, carrots, celery, leeks and onions. I also added a few fresh sprigs of fragrant herbs, clove and a bottle of good drinking wine. 

The meat was so tender and fell off the bone so easily that it was difficult to gather a whole piece into the serving dish. It was baby Aria's first pot-au-feu and I can tell she's going to have many more. After her first bite she said “miam miam” (French for yum yum)!


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Nihari Recipe (Indian Lamb Stew) Recipe

There is a meat stew dish in every culture. The version from Indian cuisine, called nihari, is one of my favorites. I made some over the weekend with lamb shanks and lamb sirloin (my favorite), but other red meats such as mutton, goat or beef can work well. The key is to use very tender meat parts. The traditional garnish is a mix of fried onions, fresh ginger, cilantro, mint, cilantro, green chiles, sliced lemons and white radish sticks. I served it with naans which is also the standard way to enjoy the dish.

Nihari, in Urdu, is derived from the word "nihar", which translates to "morning sunrinse". Originally, the stew was usually eaten in the morning after prayers. The spicy stew is very flavorful thanks to the use of bone marrow. Interestingly, this is what gives Vietnamese phở broth its body.

My husband's aunt, Phoopi, taught me how to make it, but I first heard of the dish when I met Abbi, Lulu's late grandfather. He was a savvy bridge player and we would play from time to time. He told me that back in the days in Hyderabad, India, he would invite his pals over for an all night bridge game. There would always be a large pot of nihari waiting for them the following morning at the end of their game. The nihari would simmer overnight, tenderizing the meat and thickening the gravy. Lulu's late grandmother, Baji, would finish the dish with bhaghar, which is the final red oil layer of ghee (clarified butter) commonly used in a lot of Indian dishes. Delicious!


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