Buttercream Recipes

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Vanilla Buttercream Ruffle Cake Recipe Recipe

Hi everyone! This is Sunny, Jackie’s oldest and coolest sister-in-law, and today I’m guest-posting on Pham Fatale!

So about two weeks ago I was procrastinating on Pinterest when I came across this picture:

It’s a cake by Martha Stewart. You could say it was love at first sight—one look at those adorable pink ruffles and I knew I had to make this cake. 

Only one problem; although I love to bake, I’ve never made a cake in my life. Cookies, cookie pies, brownies, blondies, but definitely nothing as glitzy as this three-layered Swiss meringue buttercream ruffled cake. But I was absolutely determined to make it, and I think it turned out pretty well. If an 18-year-old novice confectioner can make this cake, you absolutely can too. 

Instead of making a lemon cake like the one in Martha Stewart’s recipe, I decided to keep it simple with a vanilla cake and vanilla frosting. The cake batter was pretty straightforward; I like this particular recipe because the cake is the perfect balance between dense and airy. The Swiss meringue buttercream, daunting as it sounds, was also easy to make, although I would pay attention to a few helpful tips when making it. 

The real fun came when it was time to frost the cake. After frosting and crumb coating the cake, I refrigerated it overnight to let it set. For the ruffles, I used a Wilton #124 piping tip, although many other petal tips would also work. It was a matter of watching several YouTube videos and practicing a bit on the side of my mixing bowl, but I definitely got the hang of it after a few ruffles. Two of my sisters also had a go, and we had a lot of fun. I decided not to ruffle all the way into the middle and instead filled the center with some whipped cream. The finished cake wasn’t perfect, but the ruffles are very forgiving. And so cute!

Vanilla Buttercream Recipe with Picture

Sunny
Sunny, our very talented teen baker.


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Cranberry Jam Buttercream Cake Recipe Recipe

I can't believe it's already the weekend! And you know what this means: it's that time of the week when I bake sweets. I got the recipe for today’s dessert from the amazing Gesine Bullock-Prado's book, “Bake It Like You Mean It”. I prepared two génoise cakes, and once they came out of the oven, I drizzled them with a bit of rum, then let them cool to room temperature. The next steps were to prepare the frosting of the cake and chocolate decoration. 

To be in tune with the upcoming Thanksgiving season, I made a cranberry jam buttercream frosting, which is ultra easy. I know I'm not a professional baker just by looking at the photo but there were at least three good things I could comment about: the cake definitely looked homemade, I used a pretty serving platter to counteract the aesthetic of the cake, and most important, it tasted divine. Note to self: stick to cupcakes! 


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Green Tea Cake Roll Recipe  Recipe

Green Tea Cake Roll Recipe

09.10.10 by Jackie

Cake rolls, as the name implies, are cakes that are spread with jelly or buttercream and then rolled into logs. The French name is roulade. For this recipe, I decided to use matcha green tea because of its very delicate flavor. It also gives the cake (called génoise in French) a beautiful jade green color. I filled and covered the cake with vanilla butter-cream and kept the flavors appropriately Zen in their simplicity.

Matcha green tea is fairly expensive and has a very short shelf life, so once the box is unsealed, consume it fast. Enjoy it as is with hot water or flavor your favorite desserts with the green tea powder. I had a little less than one tablespoon left in the tin. I think I had made pretty good use of it with desserts such as Vietnamese agar agar desserts, tea lattés, crème brulées and ice cream.

Green Tea Cake Recipe with Picture


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Crepe Cake with Butterscotch Cream Recipe

Mille Crêpe, also known as Gâteau de Crêpe, is a multi-layered cake made out of crêpes. I spread layers of butterscotch buttercream in between each crêpe and topped the cake with thinly-sliced candied apples. This is quite time-consuming to make in miniature versions, but you can always make large crêpes and cut the cake into slices as you would with regular buttercream cakes.

I made the cake in honor of La chandeleur (Candlemas), which is celebrated on February 2nd. It's originally a Christian tradition that celebrates the presentation of Jesus at the Temple and also marks the end of the Epiphany season (Kings' galettes are made). I don't exactly know how crêpes became part of the French celebration of La Chandeleur, but I do know that they are an integral part of the festivities. There is a legend that says that on the day of La Chandeleur, if you're able to flip a crêpe and make it land properly (without it being wrinkled) in the pan without dropping it on the floor, you'll have a prosperous year. Originally,  prosperity referred to a bumper crop of grain, but with fewer and fewer people farming for a living, over time it's come to imply general wealth. In a way it's an enduring testament to the agrarian culture of yore. That culture has survived in other ways too; in fact the saying avoir beaucoup de blé, which literally means "To have a lot of wheat", is slang for "being wealthy".

If you want to practice, prepare the crêpe batter a couple of days in advance, cook a few, and try to flip them. It may not fill your pocketbook, but it's a great way to fill your tummy.


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Mango and Coconut Yule Log Cake (Buche de Noel) Recipe

Bûche de Noël is known by many names. Whether you call it a Yule Log, roulade or simply a roll cake, few desserts are as synonymous with Christmas. For this recipe, the roll cake I used is a simple, coconut-flavored génoise. It's basically a sponge cake. The filling is a mango and rum ganache and I made a chocolate rum butter-cream to cover the log.

When I was a kid in France, we used to buy a Yule Log every year. It may seem strange, but the flavor we would always get was mango. It's like a warm tropical breeze on a cold winter night. Though mango is clearly not a traditional holiday flavor, once you try this Bûche de Noël, you won't go back to vanilla and chocolate.


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