Papaya Recipes

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Papaya Soup Recipe (Canh Du Du) Recipe

Papaya Soup Recipe (Canh Du Du)

11.15.11 by Jackie

I love incorporating fruits in savory dishes. Soups are a great way to do it, and today I made a soup similar to Vietnamese pumpkin soup (canh), but substituted ripe papaya for the pumpkin. It's called "canh đu đủ" in Vietnamese. I made the soup using chicken stock; you could use fish stock, vegetable broth or any other of your favorite flavorings. The natural sweetness from the papaya balances the flavors of a soup broth very well. At first sight, the beautiful orange color is reminiscent of fall colors due to the presence of carotenes in papaya. The flavor is quite different though. If you're looking for a healthy, flavorful soup, this is it.

In addition to tasting delicious, in Asian culture, old wives' tales say that papaya soup increases lactation for breastfeeding women. True or not, if you've just given birth, this recipe could help.


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Cold Rice Salad with Papaya Recipe

Cold Rice Salad with Papaya

06.13.11 by Jackie

We finally have beautiful sunshine in the Bay Area. We've been waiting for the sun for so long that today, in honor of our quite overdue patron of summer, I prepared a dish that is refreshing, healthy and flavorful.

Specifically, I made a cold rice and papaya salad. I boiled brown rice, and mixed in vegetables, steamed lentils, lime juice, ginger and fresh papaya. The key to good rice salad is to have a homogeneous mixture. All the ingredients should be cut the same size. The other factor for a good salad in general is a flavorful dressing. I met that requirement with a sweet and spicy papaya ginger dressing.

This version is vegetarian, but you could also finish the salad with grilled jumbo shrimp in shells or grilled chicken breasts. Also, I served it in tea cups. For an original presentation, you could serve it in papaya halves. Here comes the sun!


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Vietnamese Papaya Salad with Beef Jerky: Goi Du Du Kho Bo Recipe Recipe

I've posted several Vietnamese salad recipes (called gơi) but amusingly, I've never posting my favorite of all: Món gơi đu đủ thịt khô . The salad is made of shredded green papaya, daikon radish and beef jerky. I used Vietnamese-style beef jerky, which is slightly sweet and spicy. I love this type of gơi salad so much; I ended up polishing off three bowls. In the end though, I didn't feel too bad as this dish is pretty healthy. Now, if it were three plates of Vietnamese fried shrimp and sweet potatoes (called khoai lan chiên tôm)…

Note: Glossary of relevant Vietnamese cooking terms.

Bò = beef

Món = dish

Gơi = salad

Đu đủ = papaya

Khô = dried

Thịt = meat


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Papaya Smoothie Recipe (Sinh To Du Du) Recipe

Sinh tố đu đủ literally translates in Vietnamese to papaya (đu đủ) vitamin (sinh tố). I've made sinh tố in the past with creamy avocado, but I got my hands on a beautiful papaya, so I made this version instead. You can also make many variations of the Vietnamese drink such as jackfruit, durian or mango depending on what you have on hand. The usual sweetener is sweetened condensed milk. You can blend the fruit with either yogurt, soy milk, regular cow's milk, coconut milk or coconut water.

I love wandering through ethnic markets. They're a great place to find interesting ingredients to develop new recipes. This weekend, my husband Lulu and I went to Mi Pueblo supermarket in East Palo Alto after a trip to the nearby Home Depot. Along with the beautifully ripe papaya, which reminded us of our last trip to Cancun, I found nopales (cactus), exotic banana varieties and the best horchata I’ve had in a long time. On top of that, the staff was incredibly friendly and helpful. I’m definitely going back for more great Mexican ingredients.


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Mon Poulet Roti (Roast Chicken wih a citrus butter marinade) Recipe

This recipe is in honor of my mom, who would serve "un poulet rôti" every week when I was growing up. My dad was all for the breast and neck, my mom for the wings, my little brother and big sister and I were all crazy about the thighs and the most succulent part: the "soliles" - in English it is referred to as the "oyster" of the chicken. It's the little oval pieces of dark meat next to the thighs that you can find on each side of the carcass.

To make this recipe, I've combined the tips and secrets from all the mamas that I know.  Regardless of which part of the chicken is your favorite, you are guaranteed to produce a moist, crispy-skinned chicken.  It takes time to prepare, but the results are well worth the wait. The chicken may look fantastic, but I guarantee that by the end of the meal you'll have rolled up your sleeves and will be sucking every last drop of goodness from the leftover bones. Vegetarians, avert your eyes!


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