Kaffir Lime Leaf Recipes

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Hot and Sour Thai Soup Recipe Recipe

Hot and Sour Thai Soup Recipe

01.13.12 by Jackie

Tom Yum Thai soup has a unique taste. It's both spicy and sour and loaded with amazing flavors such as lemongrass, galangal, fresh kaffir limes leaves and coconut milk. For this version, I combined fresh water chestnuts, sugar snap peas, tamarind, red chili powder, baby squid and mackerel. You could also add shrimp or chicken. And of course, the soup is easy to make vegetarian as well.

The warmth of the broth is very soothing. I usually serve this seafood soup with a bowl of steamed jasmine rice on the side, which makes a complete meal while still being pretty healthy (you could also omit the coconut milk if you're health conscious). Give this recipe a try; I promise you won't be disappointed!


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Canh Chua Tom Recipe (Vietnamese Shrimp Soup) Recipe

Canh chua tôm literally translates to "sour shrimp soup" in Vietnamese. The name and the flavor come from the combination of kaffir lime leaves, tamarind and pineapple. A hint of spiciness from Thai chiles makes the soup especially soothing. I've been a bit under the weather the past few days and the warm broth worked wonders on my congestion.

There are many variations of this seafood recipe. In this particular version, I mixed oyster mushrooms and fresh water chestnuts, which added crunch to the soup. I served it as a main course, so I added rice round noodles to make the meal complete. If you decide to serve it at an Asian-themed dinner, this canh (soup) is a light way to start a meal.


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Cha Tom Recipe (Vietnamese Shrimp Cakes) Recipe

Chả tôm are lightly seasoned shrimp cakes. No tasteless fillers here; a sprinkling of tapioca starch, coriander, green onions, garlic and kaffir lime are the only ingredients added to supplement the flavor and texture of the shrimp. It is true Vietnamese comfort food.

These shrimp cakes make wonderful appetizers, but can also be served as an entrée. Just pair them with vermicelli (called bún chả tôm) and you'll have yourself a very traditional Vietnamese meal. You could also make mini sandwiches for a change of pace. I served them recently as appetizers for a dinner party with a plum dipping sauce. They will be delicious no matter how you choose to prepare them!


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Dried Apricot and Carrot Salad on Betel Leaves Recipe

Lulu's aunt, Sara, gave Daddy a betel leaf plant a few months ago. It has grown from a small vine into a prolific producer of fragrant leaves. Daddy loves chewing areca nuts wrapped in a betel leaf. It's very popular in India (paan parag) as well as Vietnam (trầu). In much of Southeast Asia, betel leaves are used to make a salad.

For the shredded carrot salad I made today, I decided to use the fresh betel leaves as a serving dish of sorts. To the shredded carrots, I added diced dried apricots and a fresh, thinly shredded kaffir lime leaf. The combination of the ingredients worked very well together. Betel leaves have a peppery taste and the kaffir lime has a nice citrus-y aroma. In keeping with the Asian theme, I made a peanut and tamarind dressing to brighten up the dish and tie all the flavors together.

Edible Betel leaves Picture


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Kaffir Lime Ginger Glaze Recipe Recipe

Kaffir Lime Ginger Glaze Recipe

06.18.09 by Jackie

I have received many requests for the kaffir lime ginger glaze recipe. I keep forgetting to post it.

The story behind this glaze is kind of funny. I had just made a sweet and sour soup and my mother-in-law came into the kitchen to help clean up. She saw the leftover kaffir lime leaves, picked them up and was about to throw them in the trash. Even though we get our kaffir lim leaves from our garden, it felt like a waste. I shrieked and told her, I told her that I was going to use them. She asked me how I planned on using the leaves since we weren't making any more soup. I had to come up with something fast, so I said that I would use them in the glaze for the apricot tarts that were in the oven.

I added a little ginger to the syrup to balance out the citrus-y flavor of the kaffir lime leaves and I incorporated a little cornstarch to the syrup to get a thicker consistency because typically I use fruit jellies as a glaze. It turned out wonderfully.


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