Condensed Milk Recipes

Coconut Macaroon Pie Recipe Recipe

Coconut Macaroon Pie Recipe

06.07.13 by Jackie

This week has gone by so fast, I can't believe it's already Dessert Friday! To celebrate the end of school (and finals) and to reward the girls for their hard work, I decided to bake a pie.

The girls love coconut macaroons, so I decided to prepare a coconut macaroon pie. I made the filling with sweetened shredded coconut flakes and sweetened condensed milk. I served the pie with coconut flavored whipped cream, but I think coconut ice cream would have been even better! 


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Sinh To Mit Recipe (Vietnamese Jackfruit Smoothie) Recipe

Sinh To Mit Recipe (Vietnamese Jackfruit Smoothie)

04.20.12 by Jackie

Sinh tố  trái cây are popular Vietnamese snack drinks. The phrase literally translates to "fruit vitamins", but you know them better as smoothies.

This particular smoothie is flavored with jackfruit (mít in Vietnamese). The secret ingredient though is the mung beans (đậu xanh), which provide a creamy and consistent texture. The fresh ripe fruit gives a natural sweetness to the smoothie, which is enhanced by the addition of condensed milk and ice cream.

Note: Glossary of relevant Vietnamese cooking terms.

Sinh tố
= vitamins

Trái cây = fruit

Đậu xanh = green lentils

Mít = jackfruit


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Papaya Smoothie Recipe (Sinh To Du Du) Recipe

Papaya Smoothie Recipe (Sinh To Du Du)

05.10.11 by Jackie

Sinh tố đu đủ literally translates in Vietnamese to papaya (đu đủ) vitamin (sinh tố). I've made sinh tố in the past with creamy avocado, but I got my hands on a beautiful papaya, so I made this version instead. You can also make many variations of the Vietnamese drink such as jackfruit, durian or mango depending on what you have on hand. The usual sweetener is sweetened condensed milk. You can blend the fruit with either yogurt, soy milk, regular cow's milk, coconut milk or coconut water.

I love wandering through ethnic markets. They're a great place to find interesting ingredients to develop new recipes. This weekend, my husband Lulu and I went to Mi Pueblo supermarket in East Palo Alto after a trip to the nearby Home Depot. Along with the beautifully ripe papaya, which reminded us of our last trip to Cancun, I found nopales (cactus), exotic banana varieties and the best horchata I’ve had in a long time. On top of that, the staff was incredibly friendly and helpful. I’m definitely going back for more great Mexican ingredients.


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How to Make Ca Phe Sua Da (Vietnamese Iced Coffee) Recipe

How to Make Ca Phe Sua Da (Vietnamese Iced Coffee)

06.26.10 by Jackie

The key to making cà phê sữa dá is freshly ground, dark, extra bold roast blend coffee. In addition to this, you’ll need a Vietnamese coffee filter and sweetened condensed milk. If you're ready for a day full of energy, or if caffeine doesn't seem to leave you sleepless at night, give this drink a try!

As I mentioned on Facebook this week, I recently learned an important lesson: never drink Vietnamese coffee in the evening if you're sensitive to caffeine. Last weekend, I drank an entire cup of iced coffee right before going to bed (silly, I know). Since I'm not a big coffee drinker, I spent une nuit blanche, which is a French idiom that translates to "a white night" (an "all-nighter" in English). I love Vietnamese iced coffee (cà phê sữa dá in Vietnamese) but my body doesn't seem to appreciate it!


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How To Make Vietnamese Yogurt (Homemade Yogurt Recipe) Recipe

How To Make Vietnamese Yogurt (Homemade Yogurt Recipe)

06.13.10 by Jackie

The weather is getting so much warmer in the Bay Area that I thought we all could use a cool treat. Of course, I pulled out the ice cream machine, but since we’ve been exercising lately, I decided a healthy alternative was in order. So that’s why I pulled out my yogurt jars and made our family's favorite: Vietnamese yogurt. In Vietnamese, it's called sữa chua, which literally translates to "sour milk". It's also often referred to as da ua, which is the pidgin French term for "yaourt" (Vietnamese language swallows the consonant sounds from the French term).

Making Vietnamese yogurt is very easy and doesn’t even require a yogurt maker. The main ingredient is of course milk (sữa bò); to this are added condensed milk (hộp sữa đặc), warm water (nước sôi) and a ready-made-made yogurt (starter) to start the fermentation. You can find this starter, called hủ da ua cái, in Asian stores for $1.50 to $2.00 a jar.

Vietnamese yogurt is soft and tastes sour, sweet and a little tart. Once you try it, you'll be just as addicted as my family is! 


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